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Matthew Crain

Twenty-five years of neoliberal political economy are to blame for today’s regime of surveillance advertising, and only public policy can undo it.

Demonstrators wave pro-choice signs in front of Supreme Court
Rachel Rebouché

Boston Review speaks with Rachel Rebouché on the post-Dobbs legal landscape.

Samuel Clowes Huneke

The patchwork of government regulations around sex and gender causes endless misery for transgender people. A new book considers how gender became so integral to bureaucracy.

Boston Review

As Roe is struck down by the Supreme Court, we bring together recent and archival essays to assess what is at stake—and how we might move from reproductive rights to reproductive justice.

Stuart Schrader

Its illegitimacy goes far beyond the war on drugs.

Joseph Fishkin William E. Forbath

We must reject the legal liberalism that attempts to cordon off constitutional questions from democratic politics.

People gathered at the UN Human Rights Council
Zachary Manfredi

Critics say human rights discourse blunts social transformation. It doesn’t have to.

Stuart Streichler

Amidst the January 6 hearings, the fiftieth anniversary of Nixon’s scandal reminds us that it has only gotten harder to hold presidents accountable.

Paul Gowder

The language of universal rights can be a powerful tool for advancing social justice.

Harmony Goldberg Erica Smiley

Recent union drives point the way to more effective action against corporate power.

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Professor of Law and Government at Cornell University. Margulies was Counsel of Record in Rasul v. Bush (2004), involving detentions at the Guantánamo Bay Naval Station.