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Sheryl Sandberg standing in front a big board showing Facebook's network of social connections
Matthew Crain

Twenty-five years of neoliberal political economy are to blame for today’s regime of surveillance advertising, and only public policy can undo it.

Portrait of historian Robin D.G. Kelley
Robin D. G. Kelley

Robin D. G. Kelley published his pathbreaking history of the Black radical imagination in 2002. Where are we two decades later?

Jamie Martin

To escape the imperial legacies of the IMF and World Bank, we need a radical new vision for global economic governance.

Mie Inouye

How a new class of “salts”—radicals who take jobs to help unionization—is boosting the organizing efforts of long-term workers.

Sports car parked outside a mansion in Belgravia, London
Oliver Bullough Daniel Penny

For decades, UK-based financial institutions have exploited loopholes to subvert regulations and shield the wealthy from scrutiny.

Nic Johnson Robert Manduca

As the neoliberal order unravels, the international economic system can and must make room for cooperative forms of state-driven development.

Raj Patel

The Global South will suffer the most as colonial legacies, climate change, and capitalism continue to plunge millions into hunger.

Max Haiven

With the invasion causing a global shortage of sunflower oil, palm oil is back on the rise. But the commodity’s bloody history is instructive of how global capitalism can and can’t be fixed.

Robin D. G. Kelley

While W. E. B. Du Bois praised an expanding penitentiary system, T. Thomas Fortune called for investment in education and a multiracial, working-class movement.

Lucy Song

By casting doubt on multiracial working-class solidarity, Jay Caspian Kang’s critique of professional identity politics fails on its own terms.

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