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Special Project

Thinking in a Pandemic

We’ve brought together all our COVID-19 coverage in one place. Here you’ll find the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it.

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Adam Gaffney

In addition to masks and ventilators, doctors demand a fundamental transformation of our health care system.

Amy Hoffman HIV AIDS COVID-19
Amy Hoffman

During the AIDS crisis, different contingents of the LGBTQ movement set aside their differences to prioritize mutual care. What can we learn from this strategy today? And why is it still so difficult to talk about AIDS?

Mordecai Lyon COVID-19 rent strike
Mordecai Lyon

While the government and some banks have announced mortgage moratoriums, they have not insisted that rent relief be passed on to tenants. Many renters don’t know what they will do come April 1, let alone May 1.

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Michael Bronski

The HIV/AIDS and COVID-19 pandemics are very different, but both reveal that the United States has never understood the connection between community and personal well-being.

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Andrew Elrod Mark Engler

The battle over the bailout—set to be delivered through a once-obscure Treasury Department mechanism called the Exchange Stabilization Fund—has only just begun.

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Robert L. Tsai

It’s easy to interpret the disorder of our COVID-19 response through the lens of unpreparedness or partisanship. But that misses the complex legal structure of emergency governance.

Andrew Lanham anti-Chinese racism coronavirus COVID
Andrew Lanham

The United States has a long history of blaming Asian immigrants for outbreaks of disease. Every time, democracy and public health suffer.

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Lenore Palladino

We face an economic crisis not least because the rules of corporate governance slight workers and preclude economic resiliency. We must reform them now.

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Amy Kapczynski Gregg Gonsalves

Claims that the cure is worse than the disease rely on a false tradeoff between human needs and the economy.

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Felicia Wong Mike Konczal

Our long-term goal must go well beyond the Senate bill to build a more resilient economy.

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…we need your help. Confronting the many challenges of COVID-19—from the medical to the economic, the social to the political—demands all the moral and deliberative clarity we can muster. In Thinking in a Pandemic, we’ve organized the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it. While much remains uncertain, Boston Review’s responsibility to public reason is sure. That’s why you’ll never see a paywall or ads. It also means that we rely on you, our readers, for support. If you like what you read here, pledge your contribution to keep it free for everyone by making a tax-deductible donation.

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