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Arts in Society

Arts in Society brings our previously siloed poetry and fiction—along with cultural criticism and belles lettres—into a common project. It focuses on how the arts—including the visual arts, theater, dance, and film—can speak directly to the most pressing political and civic concerns, including racism, inequality, poverty, demagoguery, sex- and gender-based violence, a disempowered electorate, and a collapsing natural world.

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Poetry

Remembering poets Lynda Hull and Michael S. Harper, with original portraits

Terrance Hayes
Poetry

As my relatives melted, I stood
on one leg, raised my arms, eyes shut, & thought:
tree tree tree as death passed me—untouched.

Ocean Vuong

Critics tend to discount Rich’s later poems, fundamentally misunderstanding how they engage her radical vision of community.

Ed Pavlić
Terrance Hayes

A series of creative reflections on why Yusef Komunyakaa remains one of our greatest living writers and what it means to be a Black Jazz Poet.

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Walter Kendrick

It would be simpler to burn a few magazines than to explore the economic, social, and psychological factors of which both rape and pornography are symptoms.

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Adrienne Rich

Adrienne Rich on Elizabeth Bishop.

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Tom Hart

Art is where you find it.

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Helen Vendler

The most extraordinary teacher of poetry I ever encountered.

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Katherine Singer Kovacs

To those who are familiar with his writings, Borges’s transformation into a public personality is of supreme irony.

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Grace Paley Gail Pool Shirley Roses

Writer, teacher, and political activist.

Stephen Schmidt

From our Winter 1975 issue, a review of the noted cook’s new collection of recipes, her fiesty spirit, and why it took “such a woman to sell us Americans on the difficult, alien art of French cooking.” 

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Glenn Gould

From the Winter 1975 issue of Boston Review: Glenn Gould argues that despite being a prolific composer, Ernst Krenek is one of the least understood musical figures of the twentieth century.

Geoffrey Movius Susan Sontag

Geoffrey Movius speaks with Susan Sontag about photography, writing, and memory.

Julia Child

The renowned cook appeared in our first ever issue from June 1975. Here she reviews a gastronomic history of American cooking, sings the praises of a recipe for pimiento custard spread, and details her obsession with all things corn.

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Chair of African American and African Diaspora Studies; Director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies, and the William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African American Studies at Columbia University.