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Arts in Society

Arts in Society

Arts in Society brings our previously siloed poetry and fiction—along with cultural criticism and belles lettres—into a common project. It focuses on how the arts—including the visual arts, theater, dance, and film—can speak directly to the most pressing political and civic concerns, including racism, inequality, poverty, demagoguery, sex- and gender-based violence, a disempowered electorate, and a collapsing natural world.

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Poetry

Hazem Fahmy was a finalist for the 2019 Boston Review Annual Poetry Contest and this poem appeared in our arts anthology Allies.

Hazem Fahmy
Tess Liem Poetry
Tess Liem
camus2

The French Algerian writer steadfastly defended democracy and humanity against dogmatic ideologies of all stripes. We need to read and reread him today.

Mugambi Jouet
Julian K. Jarboe

“Come back, Sebastian. You are shaking. That is not a productive movement.” As Sebastian prepares to go work on the moon, he reviews his contract’s terms and conditions and wonders what his mother must think.

Jarboe Everyone on the Moon 2 Fiction
John Crowley

Amidst a boys’ club of ’70s-era comics, Shary Flenniken’s Trots and Bonnie was unique for its feminist depiction of the political and sexual awakening of young women.

Ed Pavlić

Critics tend to discount Rich’s later poems, fundamentally misunderstanding how they engage her radical vision of community.

David Grundy

John Wieners was one of the most important gay poets of his generation, but subsequent decades have seen him all but forgotten. A new collection of his letters vividly returns him to readers.

Boston Review

A recording of our digital reading of poetry, fiction, and essays from our annual literary anthology, with ASL interpreting.

Houman Barekat

Newly translated into English, Minae Mizumura’s An I-Novel is a vivid portrait of immigrant displacement and the ironies of our global cultural ecosystem.

Erika Howsare

In a new book of lyric essays, poet Cole Swensen answers a call issued by theorists Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel: to reimagine the globe in terms of the fragile surface ecosystems that support all life.

C. X. Hua

Winner of the 2019 Boston Review Annual Poetry Contest

Boston Review

A recording of our discussion about the recovery of one of Wainaina’s lost stories and his continued importance to the African literary landscape.

Fiction
Izumi Suzuki Sam Bett

The last humans on a planet attempt a nice family outing—except that they can’t remember how. A short story from Japanese counterculture icon Izumi Suzuki, available for the first time in English in a new translation by Sam Bett.

Emily Lordi

A Sun Ra tribute concert by a member of the pathbreaking pop group Labelle leads to reflections on how Black women artists and scientists have often been at the vanguard of their disciplines—though most are still awaiting due recognition.

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Sonia Sanchez 2
Christina Knight Sonia Sanchez

Popular Authors

Author of eleven published or forthcoming books, including Who Can Afford to Improvise?: James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the Listener. He is Distinguished Research Professor in the English Department and in the Institute for African American Studies at the University of Georgia.