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Special Project

Thinking in a Pandemic

We’ve brought together all our COVID-19 coverage in one place. Here you’ll find the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it.

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Vafa Ghazavi

We may feel individually powerless to contribute to social transformation. But each of us bears responsibility for helping to create a more just world.

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Judith Levine

What does solidarity look like when our bodies cannot come together, in public, to agitate for a better world?

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Sarah Burgard Lucie Kalousova

Mortality rates typically fall during economic downturns. But the unprecedented features of the COVID-19 shutdown suggest that trend might not hold this time.

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Yasheng Huang

Some have praised China's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, but its suppression of information helped cause the problem in the first place.

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Paul Hockenos

Germany's low death rate and quick payout of relief to workers makes a case for social democracy as preparedness.

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Jeremy A. Greene

Early advocates thought it could provide equal access to high-quality care. But private investment has increasingly crowded out public service, and use is now surging during the COVID-19 crisis.

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Paul R. Katz Leandro Ferreira

Despite President Bolsonaro's COVID-19 denialism, a small Brazilian city has one of the most ambitious responses in the world.

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Shaun Ossei-Owusu

COVID-19 is having a disproportionate effect among vulnerable populations.

Brishen Rogers

COVID-19 has exposed the fragility of our labor markets just as much as the fragility of our public health and welfare systems. As we take the economy out of its induced coma, we should ask what kinds of jobs we want and need.

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Alex de Waal

We should be wary of simplistic uses of history, but we can learn from the logic of social responses.

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…we need your help. Confronting the many challenges of COVID-19—from the medical to the economic, the social to the political—demands all the moral and deliberative clarity we can muster. In Thinking in a Pandemic, we’ve organized the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it. While much remains uncertain, Boston Review’s responsibility to public reason is sure. That’s why you’ll never see a paywall or ads. It also means that we rely on you, our readers, for support. If you like what you read here, pledge your contribution to keep it free for everyone by making a tax-deductible donation.

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