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Special Project

Thinking in a Pandemic

We’ve brought together all our COVID-19 coverage in one place. Here you’ll find the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it.

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Anne L. Alstott

Society relies on the unpaid, invisible work of parents—mostly mothers—to care for children and to buffer kids from trauma and stress. Supporting that work during COVID-19 requires direct cash support to families.

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Mark Bould

In films such as Contagion, virology is often confused with the invisible workings of capital.

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Adele Lebano

With few restrictions and no tracing of the disease’s spread, the government is relying upon Swedish character and traditions to see it through the pandemic.

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Angus Deaton Joshua Cohen

Boston Review talks with Nobel Prize-winning economist Angus Deaton about COVID-19, the relationship between culture, financial hardship, and health, and why capitalism’s flaws are proving fatal for America’s working class. 

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Cailin O’Connor James Owen Weatherall

How a drug became an object lesson in political tribalism.

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Jonathan Fuller

COVID-19 has revealed a contest between two competing philosophies of scientific knowledge. To manage the crisis, we must draw on both.

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Erin McElroy Meredith Whittaker Genevieve Fried

Proptech is leading to new forms of housing injustice in ways that increase the power of landlords and further disempower tenants and those seeking shelter.

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Walter Johnson Jason Q. Purnell Colin Gordon Jamala Rogers

Black Americans are dying of COVID-19 at much higher rates than whites, and nowhere more so than in St. Louis. This is the result of racist policies which collapsed the social safety net while setting blacks in the path of danger.

Jeffrey Aaron Snyder

Besides overturning the very structure of higher education virtually overnight, COVID-19 will also accelerate a number of troubling longer-term trends—including less public funding and a migration of courses online.

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Michael Brenes Michael Franczak

Any attempt to revive solidarity between rich and poor nations must begin by recapturing the commitment to social and economic rights on which the WHO was founded.

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…we need your help. Confronting the many challenges of COVID-19—from the medical to the economic, the social to the political—demands all the moral and deliberative clarity we can muster. In Thinking in a Pandemic, we’ve organized the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it. While much remains uncertain, Boston Review’s responsibility to public reason is sure. That’s why you’ll never see a paywall or ads. It also means that we rely on you, our readers, for support. If you like what you read here, pledge your contribution to keep it free for everyone by making a tax-deductible donation.

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