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Special Project

Thinking in a Pandemic

We’ve brought together all our COVID-19 coverage in one place. Here you’ll find the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it.

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John P. A. Ioannidis

As policymakers debate the right response to COVID-19, they must take seriously the harms of pandemic policies, not just their benefits.

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Peter Godfrey-Smith

Science’s victory over bacteria, viruses, and other microbes is far from assured—and we may be part of the problem.

Aaron Horvath Jean Lin community organizations COVID-19
Aaron Horvath Jean Lin

Nonprofits have proven to be critical links in the nation’s public health infrastructure, but even those with mandates unrelated to health and poverty relief are turning out to be integral to their communities’ survival.

Lauren Carasik ICE COVID-19 coronavirus immigration detention
Lauren Carasik

The pandemic risks turning immigration detention into a death sentence for many, yet the Trump administration has rejected calls for mass humanitarian release, and continues to deport infectious detainees to Latin America.

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In this ongoing series, leading researchers debate how to turn knowledge into action.

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Rajan Menon Jeffrey Kucik

The deep, growing divisions in U.S. society have an outsize effect in determining who suffers from this pandemic—as well as how the government responds.

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Roberto Tallarita

In the fight against COVID-19, weighing costs and benefits is indispensable for moral clarity. At the same time, we must not forget its limits.

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Nicholas Rush Smith

As we know from South Africa's crisis, political and social fault lines will shape the contours of joblessness.

Bianca Wylie Toronto Sidewalk Labs Google
Bianca Wylie

Sidewalk Labs would have turned a large plot of Toronto’s public land into a private lab for data collection. Cities need better digital governance to protect against such attempts.

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Marc Lipsitch

For the sake of both science and action in the COVID-19 pandemic, we need collaboration among specialists, not sects.

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…we need your help. Confronting the many challenges of COVID-19—from the medical to the economic, the social to the political—demands all the moral and deliberative clarity we can muster. In Thinking in a Pandemic, we’ve organized the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it. While much remains uncertain, Boston Review’s responsibility to public reason is sure. That’s why you’ll never see a paywall or ads. It also means that we rely on you, our readers, for support. If you like what you read here, pledge your contribution to keep it free for everyone by making a tax-deductible donation.

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