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Special Project

Thinking in a Pandemic

We’ve brought together all our COVID-19 coverage in one place. Here you’ll find the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it.

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Anne McDonough Daniel E. Ho Oluchi Mbonu

We know that faculty retirement policies shape racial and gender diversity on campus. What universities do now in the face of COVID-19 will have long-term consequences.

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Amy Moran-Thomas

Pulse oximeters give biased results for people with darker skin. The consequences could be serious.

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Astra Taylor Todd Wolfson

Astra Taylor talks with Rutgers faculty union president Todd Wolfson about organizing academic communities in the age of COVID-19.

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From COVID-19 to Black Lives Matter. Order our latest book now.

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Natalie Dean

There’s no silver bullet, but local experiments and global experiences can help us control the pandemic.

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Debraj Ray S. Subramanian

For weeks the country enforced a strict lockdown without providing adequate medical and economic support. As cases soar, its people are now paying the price.

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Iris Chandler Marco Ramos Tess Lanzarotta

American medicine has long functioned as an elitist institution, putting professional prestige over the well-being of patients and physicians alike.

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F. M. Kamm

Three things we need to get right.

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Dora Vargha Jeremy A. Greene

History shows that outbreaks rarely have tidy conclusions.

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David S. Jones Stefan Helmreich

Epidemic waves serve not just to predict but also to persuade. Their special blend of mathematical and moral messaging will shape the future of the pandemic.

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…we need your help. Confronting the many challenges of COVID-19—from the medical to the economic, the social to the political—demands all the moral and deliberative clarity we can muster. In Thinking in a Pandemic, we’ve organized the latest arguments from doctors and epidemiologists, philosophers and economists, legal scholars and historians, activists and citizens, as they think not just through this moment but beyond it. While much remains uncertain, Boston Review’s responsibility to public reason is sure. That’s why you’ll never see a paywall or ads. It also means that we rely on you, our readers, for support. If you like what you read here, pledge your contribution to keep it free for everyone by making a tax-deductible donation.

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