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Forum XV (Summer 2020)

The Politics of Care

From the COVID-19 pandemic to uprisings over police brutality, we are living in the greatest social crisis of a generation. But the roots of these latest emergencies stretch back decades. At their core is a brutal neoliberal ideology that combines deep structural racism with a relentless assault on social welfare. Contributors to this volume not only protest these neoliberal roots of our present catastrophe, but they insist there is another way forward: a new kind of politics—a politics of care—that centers people’s basic needs and connections to fellow citizens, the global community, and the natural world.

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The Politics of Care

 

From the COVID-19 pandemic to uprisings over police brutality, we are living in the greatest social crisis of a generation. But the roots of these latest emergencies stretch back decades. At their core is a brutal neoliberal ideology that combines deep structural racism with a relentless assault on social welfare. Its results are the failing economic and public health systems we confront today—those that benefit the few and put the most vulnerable in harm’s way.

Contributors to this volume not only protest these neoliberal roots of our present catastrophe, but they insist there is another way forward: a new kind of politics—a politics of care—that centers people’s basic needs and connections to fellow citizens, the global community, and the natural world. Imagining a world that promotes the health and well-being of all, they draw on different backgrounds—from public health to philosophy, history to economics, literature to activism—as well as the example of other countries and the past, from the AIDS activist group ACT-UP to the Black radical tradition. Together they point to a future, as Simon Waxman writes, where “no one is disposable.”

 

CONTENTS


 

Editors’ Note
Deborah Chasman & Joshua Cohen
The New Politics of Care
Gregg Gonsalves and Amy Kapcyznski

 


 

IN THIS TOGETHER

 

Ethics at a Distance
Vafa Ghazavi
Love One Another or Die
Amy Hoffman
What Would Health Security Look Like?
Sunaura Taylor

 


 

COVID-19 AND POLITICAL CULTURES

Sweden’s Relaxed Approach to COVID-19 Isn’t Working
Adele Lebano
Lucky to Live in Berlin
Paul Hockenos
The Solidarity Economy
Paul R. Katz and Leandro Ferreira

 

NO ONE IS DISPOSABLE

COVID-19 and the Politics of Disposability
Shaun Ossei-Owusu
COVID-19 and the Color Line
Colin Gordon, Walter Johnson, Jason Q. Purnell, Jamala Rogers
Why Has COVID-19 Not Led to More Humanitarian Releases?
Dan Berger
Mothering in a Pandemic
Anne L. Alstott
The End of Family Values
Julie Kohler
International Labor Solidarity in a Time of Pandemic
Manoj Dias-Abey
A Politics of the Future
Simon Waxman

 

GETTING TO FREEDOM CITY

We Should Be Afraid, But Not of Protesters
Melvin L. Rogers
The Problem Isn’t Just Police, It’s Politics
Alex S. Vitale interviewed by Scott Casleton
Getting to Freedom City
Robin D. G. Kelley
Teaching African American Literature During COVID-19
Farah Jasmine Griffin

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