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Right To Be Elected cover_FINAL (2)
Forum XIV (Spring 2020)

The Right to Be Elected

What might happen if a woman’s right to vote is seen as coequal with her right to be elected? And why are other countries so much better than the United States at electing women to office?

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The Right to Be Elected

 

What might happen if a woman’s right to vote is seen as coequal with her right to be elected?

Why are other countries so much better than the United States at electing women to office? In her lead essay in this anthology, Jennifer Piscopo argues that women in the United States haven’t fought for the right to be elected. A comparative political scientist, she shows that suffrage movements around the world often focused not only on the right to vote, but also the right to stand for office. As a result, when these movements succeeded, they saw the right to be elected as a positive right, enabling nationwide-efforts to both encourage and actively recruit female candidates. In her exploration of positive and negative rights in the United States, Piscopo explores what might happen if a woman’s right to vote is seen as coequal with her right to be elected, considering, among other things, how our definitions of representational government could both change and restore public trust in democracy.

Other essays in this anthology similarly analyze history for lessons that can be applied to today’s political climate. What effects does gender parity in legislatures have both on policies enacted and government performance? How has the complicated relationship between race and gender both informed and prevented progress for both movements? And, most immediately, what will it take for a woman to be elected president in the United States?

 

 

CONTENTS

 


 

Editors’ Note

Deborah Chasman & Joshua Cohen

Introduction: Without Women There Is No Democracy

Jennifer M. Piscopo & Shauna L. Shames

 


 

FORUM

 

The Right to Be Elected

Jennifer M. Piscopo

Persuasion, Not Quotas

Alice Eagly

Changing Gendered Expectations

Suzanne Dovi

The Battle for Women’s Representation Starts in Our Homes

Dawn Langan Teele

Race Matters Too

Kerry L. Haynie

Solutions Designed for the U.S. Political Context

Kelly Dittmar

The Electability Trap

Emily Cain

Moving History Along

Jennifer M. Piscopo

 


 

ESSAYS

 

When Quotas Come Up Short

Marie E. Berry & Milli Lake

Dreaming of Democracy: Shirley Chisholm’s Political Life

Zinga A. Fraser

Save the ERA

Julie C. Suk

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