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Forum XIII (Winter 2020)

On Anger

Anger looms large in our public lives. Should it?

Reflecting on two millennia of debates about the value of anger, Agnes Callard contends that efforts to distinguish righteous forms of anger from unjust vengeance, or appropriate responses to wrongdoing from inappropriate ones, are misguided. What if, she asks, anger is both an essential and troubling part of being a moral agent in an imperfect world? The contributions that follow explore anger in its many forms—public and private, personal and political—raising an issue that we must grapple with: Does the vast well of public anger compromise us all?

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Check out the Table of Contents below, and purchase your copy here.

 

Anger looms large in our public lives. Should it?

Reflecting on two millennia of debates about the value of anger, Agnes Callard contends that efforts to distinguish righteous forms of anger from unjust vengeance, or appropriate responses to wrongdoing from inappropriate ones, are misguided. What if, she asks, anger is not a bug of human life, but a feature—an emotion that, for all its troubling qualities, is an essential part of being a moral agent in an imperfect world? And if anger is both troubling and essential, what then do we do with the implications: that angry victims of injustice are themselves morally compromised, and that it might not be possible to respond rightly to being treated wrongly? As Callard concludes, “We can’t be good in a bad world.”

The contributions that follow explore anger in its many forms—public and private, personal and political—raising an issue that we must grapple with: Does the vast well of public anger compromise us all?

 

CONTENTS

 


 

Editors' Note
Deborah Chasman & Joshua Cohen

 


 

FORUM

 

On Anger
Agnes Callard
Choosing Violence
Paul Bloom
The Kingdom of Damage
Elizabeth Bruenig
Anger and the Politics of the Oppressed
Desmond Jagmohan
The Social Life of Anger
Daryl Cameron & Victoria Spring
More Important Things
Myisha Cherry
How Anger Goes Wrong
Jesse Prinz
Accountability Without Vengeance
Rachel Achs
What’s Past Is Prologue
Barbara Herman
Against Moral Purity
Oded Na’aman
 
The Wound Is Real
Agnes Callard

 


 

ESSAYS

 

The Radical Equality of Lives
Judith Butler interviewed by Brandon M. Terry
A History of Anger
David Konstan
Victim Anger and Its Costs
Martha C. Nussbaum
Whose Anger Counts?
Whitney Phillips
Righteous Incivility 
Amy Olberding

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