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decjan05
December 2004/January 2005

Daniel Richman leads a forum on the conflict between national security and civil rights, with responses from Bob Barr, Corey Robin, and others; Christine J. Walley explains Tanzania’s people’s park; Benjamin Paloff on Bruno Schulz.

Jennifer Howard on fantasy fiction; a short story by Emily Fridlund; Zack Finch on Marjorie Welish.

 

Forum 

The Right Fight

DANIEL RICHMAN

WITH RESPONSES BY DAVID A. HARRIS, BOB BARR, EDWARD RUBIN, WILLIAM J. STUNTZ, JULIETTE KAYYEM, DAVID A. SKLANSKY, KEVIN R. JOHNSON, ELIZABETH GLAZER, RICHARD T. FORD, AND COREY ROBIN. REPLY FROM DANIEL RICHMAN.

Essays

Who Owns Bruno Schulz?
Poland stumbles over its Jewish past
Benjamin Paloff
Freedom Railway
The unexpected success of a Cold War development project
Jamie Monson
Best Intentions
The story of Tanzania’s people’s park
Christine J. Walley
What Went Wrong
Anonymous’s Imperial Hubris and The 9/11 Commission Report
Rajan Menon
Rich World, Poor World
Francis Fukuyama’s State-Building
Mick Moore
Lost Opportunities
Dennis Ross’s The Missing Peace
Jeremy Pressman
The Uses of Fantasy
Susanna Clarke’s Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
Jennifer Howard
American Fighter
On writing The Fearless Man
Donald Pfarrer

Fiction

Expecting
Emily Fridlund

On Film

See No Evil
Zhang Yimou’s Hero
Alan A. Stone

On Poetry

Master of the Same New Things
Richard Howard’s Inner Voices and Paper Trail
James Longenbach
The Politics of Reading
Marjorie Welish’s Word Group
Zack Finch
Microreviews

Poems

Poet’s Sampler
Introduced by Caroline Knox
Jibade-Khalil Huffman
Facilitas
Garth Greenwell
Nativity
L.S. Klatt
The God that Took the Place of Pleasure
Judith Hall
Pilgrim Sonnet
Andrew Grace
Pilgrim Sonnet Redux
Andrew Grace
Song Disowned
Bruce Smith
Union Square
Lori Shine

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