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2020 Supplement

Thinking in a Pandemic

COVID-19 has been not just a crisis of public health but also a crisis of public reason. What do we know, and how should we act? From masks to models and from data to drugs, the novel coronavirus has prompted a high-stakes dispute about ideas: which evidence counts, which arguments succeed, and which interventions matter. The essays in this volume—from leading physicians and epidemiologists, historians and social scientists, anthropologists and philosophers—explore this meeting place of science and society head on.

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Thinking in a Pandemic:
The Crisis of Science and Policy in the Age of COVID-19

 

Nearly a year after the first cases of COVID-19 were detected in late 2019, the brutal toll of the coronavirus pandemic continues to rise. The result has been not just a crisis of public health but also a crisis of public reason. What do we know, and how should we act? From masks to models and from data to drugs, the novel coronavirus has prompted a high-stakes dispute about ideas: which evidence counts, which arguments succeed, and which interventions matter.

The essays in this volume—from leading physicians and epidemiologists, historians and social scientists, anthropologists and philosophers—explore this meeting place of science and society head on. Combining historical reflection with careful argumentation, the contributors provide a lucid and essential guide to the greatest public debate of our time. Together they make clear that the challenge of COVID-19 has always been both scientific and social.

 

CONTENTS


 

Editor’s Note
Matt Lord

 

PANDEMIC HISTORY

New Pathogen, Old Politics
Alex de Waal
Technocracy after COVID-19
Jonathan White
How Epidemics End
Jeremy A. Greene and Dora Vargha

 

 

PANDEMIC PHILOSOPHY

Models versus Evidence
Jonathan Fuller
Good Science Is Good Science
Marc Lipsitch
The Totality of the Evidence
John P. A. Ioannidis
From Pandemic Facts to Pandemic Policies
Jonathan Fuller

 

PANDEMIC POLICY

Recessions Typically Improve Population Health, But COVID-19 May Be Different
Sarah Burgard and Lucie Kalousova
Hydroxychloroquine and the Political Polarization of Science
Cailin O’Connor and James Owen Weatherall
Will Evidence-Based Medicine Survive COVID-19?
Trisha Greenhalgh
Steps to a Better COVID-19 Response
Natalie Dean
How a Popular Medical Device Encodes Racial Bias
Amy Moran-Thomas

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