Articles in law & justice tagged with crime-and-prison

Derecka Purnell Nia T. Evans

An interview with Derecka Purnell about her new book Becoming Abolitionists, how we should think about the systems that produce violence, and, ultimately, the resources that will allow people to live safely.

Andrew Ross

We must end the widespread practice of funding government budgets by extorting poor people apprehended for minor offenses.

Amanda Alexander Danielle Sered

Effective responses to violence—preventing it, interrupting it, holding people accountable, and helping people heal—already exist. We need to learn from and invest in them.

Jonathan M. Metzl

New York State Rifle & Pistol v. Bruen may give the right—and its politics of racial resentment—a major win, but at the cost of gun control laws known to prevent shootings.

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Sonali Chakravarti

As a space for democratic deliberation and decision-making, the jury box still has the potential to shift the criminal legal system. But, first, we must change who is able to serve on a jury.

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Judith Levine

The Netflix series Dead to Me suggests that we might get closer to justice by forgiving each other and ourselves for the sometimes literally fatal flaw of being human.

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Michael Serota

Many U.S. criminal statutes betray the bedrock legal principle of mens rea. The result is a deeply unjust system that punishes the morally innocent.

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Erica R. Meiners Judith Levine

Instead of deterring sexual violence, criminalization has empowered policing and punishment. To prevent both sexual and state-inflicted abuse, we must embrace restorative justice.

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Anne Gray Fischer

Forms of gender-specific violence are baked into the structure of law enforcement. Reform efforts will fail until we eliminate police discretion over women’s bodies.

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Joseph Margulies

In many states, legal regimes sanction the predictable murder of innocent black men. Justice will not be served until the law changes.