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Beginning with a Phrase from Simone Weil

         There is no better time than the present when wehave lost everything. It doesn't mean rain falling
         at a certain declension, at a variable speed iswithout purpose or design.
        The present everything is lost in time, according tolaws of physics things shift
        when we lose sight of a present, when there is no more everything. No morepresence in everything loved.

        In the expanding model things slowly drift andeverything better than the present is lost in no time.
         A day mulches according to gravity
        and the sow bug marches. Gone, the hinge cracks,the gate swings a breeze,
        breeze contingent upon a grace opening to air,
         velocity tied to winging clay. Every anything in its peculiar station.

        The sun brightens as it bleaches, fades the spectral value in everything seen. And chaos is no better model
         when we come adrift.
        When we have lost a presence when there is nomore everything. No more presence in everything loved
        losing anything to the present. I heard a fly buzz. I heard revealed nature,
        cars in the street and the garbage, footprints of aworld, every fly a perpetual window,
        unalloyed life, gling, pinnacles of tar.

        There is no better everything than loss when wehave time. No lack in the present better than everything.
        In this expanding model rain falls
        according to laws of physics, things drift. Andeverything better than the present is gone
        in no time. A certain declension, a variable speed.
        Is there no better presence than loss?
         A grace opening to air. No better time than the present.

—Peter Gizzi



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